Author — Economist — Real Life Six Feet Under Character?

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As a kid, going to the grocery store or leaving large community events like a play or church was the longest, most excruciating part of my life. It was at these times that people would stop a funeral director (my dad) and talk. These are not just everyday conversations about the weather; more often than not, they are immediate deep dives into personal grief. These are the moments that go unacknowledged, the moments of active listening, and being there for the people who had lost someone in the past, with little to no personal benefit, just the knowledge that these moments are part of the job if you care about what you do. …


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Photo by Darius Bashar on Unsplash

“I was walking down the street and caught a whiff of perfume, and all of a sudden I was choked up and on the edge of tears. Out of nowhere, I was overwhelmed in an instant.”

Anyone at a funeral could be going through one of the hardest days they might go through in their lives psychologically. The same goes for anyone you pass walking down a busy street. …


Eternity is no longer silent.

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https://twitter.com/KimKardashian/status/1321955644736303104

What does Kanye West’s recent birthday gift signal about the future of holograms? Will the use of holograms blur the lines with those we have lost, allowing communication to continue past the point we are contributors?

As part of a recent birthday gift, Kanye West presented a hologram or Robert Kardashian Sr. (February 22, 1944-September 30, 2003) to Kim Kardashian West.

“For my birthday, Kanye got me the most thoughtful gift of a lifetime. A special surprise from heaven. A hologram of my dad. It is so lifelike! We watched it over and over, filled with emotion.” …


Your words will help.

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Photo by Nik Shuliahin on Unsplash

We often hear many similar responses from those around us when they discover that we have lost someone close to us. These responses are rooted in a mix of the proper sentiment and a loss for what to say. In these events, many of us defer to words heard many times before in a similar scenario. These are often accepted for what they are, words of condolence, and exactly what you should say if they feel appropriate.

However, the person receiving these words of condolence may not be ready to hear these words for what they are, meaningful, heartfelt condolences. Instead, some in the throes of grief might hear a simple, “I’m sorry for your loss” in an entirely different way than it was meant to be received. …


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Photo by Jake Davies on Unsplash

We often hear many similar responses from those around us when they discover that we have lost someone close to us. These responses are rooted in a mix of the proper sentiment and a loss for what to say. In these events, many of us defer to words heard many times before in a similar scenario. These are often accepted for what they are, words of condolence, and exactly what you should say if they feel appropriate.

However, the person receiving these words of condolence may not be ready to hear these words for what they are, meaningful, heartfelt condolences. Instead, some in the throes of grief might hear a simple, “I’m sorry for your loss” in an entirely different way than it was meant to be received. …


Lessons about life from an Emmy Winning Intro.

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https://www.theodysseyonline.com/why-you-should-watch-six-feet-under-you-havent-already

Anyone who has watched Six Feet Under can recall the iconic introductory main title sequence. The roughly one-and-a-half-minute show open is composed of one ethereal scene after another, punctuated with staccatos of orchestral strings and chimes written by Thomas Newman, who won an Emmy for his work. The main title sequence takes the viewer along the path of a body on its journey from the gurney to the grave in short clips, as designed by Danny Yount. Yount even won the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Main Title Design in 2002.

One of the title sequence’s iconic scenes features a table lined with framed pictures depicting an older woman. To make this scene, the production and direction crew used what was available and found some family photos of Yount’s still-living grandmother at the time. Several years later, those same photos were used and displayed as part of Yount’s grandmother’s actual funeral, held in the same family funeral home where I lived and worked at various points in my life. Six Feet Under’s logo depicts the stark, black and white artwork featuring a tree, with roots spread just wide enough and just deep enough to accommodate a casket — but in its place lies the show’s title. A printout of this logo signed by Danny Yount, which he was kind enough to offer in passing before his own grandmother’s funeral, still sits in one of the arrangement offices, placed discreetly between an urn and informational pamphlets. …


Sharing impact

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Photo by Sarah Boudreau on Unsplash

Muhammad Ali — Janis Joplin — Edward Lowe — Whitey Ford — Prince

What did these people have in common? They were all featured in The New York Time’s Editorial Obituaries.

The New York Times print edition’s obituary section is the place one would go to find individuals who have lived lives worthy of a featured obituary presented to the broadest audience of daily readers. Once you consider the high (and I do mean substantial) cost of a paid obituary in most papers, you will realize that even having a paid NYT printed obituary in today’s world implies a certain level of success. …


Monetizing Digital Mummies

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https://hrmasia.com/are-holograms-the-future-of-recruitment/

Carl Ohman and Luciano Floridi from the University of Oxford, Oxford Internet Institute, suggest that people’s digital remains, like our social media activity and online history, should be regarded in the same fashion as the human body. With care and respect rather than manipulated for commercial gain. (1)

Ohman and Floridi’s paper points out further repercussions of technology that involve our digital remains that have, before today, not been in the spectrum of possibilities, stating:

“Firms such as Eterni.me and Replica now offer consumers online chatbots, based on one’s digital footprint, which continue to live on after users die, enabling the bereaved to ‘stay in touch’ with the deceased.” …


Cemeteries sit alone in country fields or in the shade of skyscrapers. They dot the countryside and cityscapes from one town to the next, marked and unmarked worldwide.

Washington Square Park in New York City has more than 20,000 people buried under it alone; in fact, with very few of the public that walks above having any idea what has kept any development of the park at bay.

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Which brings up the question, are we going to run out of space to bury people? …


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Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

While many new options and opportunities are coming to light regarding funeral options, you have several things to consider.

Licensure and oversite provide a degree of protection to the consumer. As many new options become available, it is crucial to choose a reputable source to help you make your selection. Be cautious of companies and individuals that want to offer help with your funeral that does not have legitimate training and education to do so.

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Photo by Carson Masterson on Unsplash

A few RED FLAG:

  • A facility that has a certified and licensed funeral director on staff who is not involved in events happening in the facility, while other “cheaper” or “less-trained staff” conduct all the actual tasks is a red flag. Businesses trying to skirt the law tend to start in areas that avoid costs and time-consuming certifications. …

About

J.H. Harrington

Author of ‘Digital Remains’ available now. Proven Industry Expert. Sharing thoughts and ideas on the world we live in from birth to death and beyond.

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